One thousand paper cranes: commemorating the 70th-year anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs in Japan

One thousand paper cranes,
folded by Sadako with all her hope.
Ten years after Hiroshima’s flames,
suffering from leukaemia, she tried to cope.

One thousand paper cranes,
every single one of them dedicated.
Ten years after Hiroshima’s flames,
to survive this illness the A-bomb created.

One thousand paper cranes,
folded from her hospital bed.
Ten years after Hiroshima’s flames,
one more victim was soon added.

Millions of paper cranes,
folded all over the world for peace.
70 years after Hiroshima’s flames,
Crying out for all wars to cease.

Marcella

Note:

Sadako Sasaki was exposed to the atomic bomb in her house that was located 1600 meters from the epicentre of the atomic bomb explosion when she was two years old. She suffered no apparent injuries. When fleeing Hiroshima, she was exposed to the black rain (radioactive rain composed of ashes and dust). She grew up as a healthy and strong child until she was diagnosed with leukaemia 10 years later. Admitted in the hospital, she saw paper cranes that were sent to A-bomb patients to cheer them up. She heard that if she could fold 1000 paper cranes, her wish to survive would come true. Her classmates helped her folding and kept on folding paper cranes. Beautiful colourful patterns of paper cranes, true pieces of art folded with hope for peace and in commemoration of the victims are still folded every day and donated to the peace memorial in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by school kids from all over the world. Sadako died at 12, 8 months after being hospitalised, and having folded way more than one thousand paper cranes.

Travel tips:

  • Take a visual tour of Japan!
  • Check out this interactive map (quick tutorial) for the specific details to help you plan your trip and more articles and photos (zoom out) about the area!

2 thoughts on “One thousand paper cranes: commemorating the 70th-year anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs in Japan

  1. Pingback: Road trip in the wild Northern island of Japan: Hokkaido | Best regards from far,

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